The Crosscut Sawyers IV Original Mixed Media Painting

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The Crosscut Sawyers IV Original Mixed Media Painting

3,900.00

30x60 inches  |  ready to hang
acrylic, watercolor, watercolor paper on stained birch panel

The Jobs of Yesteryear series combines history and surrealism to tell the stories of obsolete jobs. A contemporary glimpse into the past, these mixed media paintings serve as a reminder of time and stories long forgotten.

This particular Job of Yesteryear mixed media painting features crosscut sawyers. Back in the 1850’s, lumberjacks began to harvest the giant redwoods of Northwestern California to supply the raw materials needed to house all of the 49ers heading west to strike it rich. Two-man crosscut saws were the most efficient means to fell these massive trees. First, a notch would be made on the side of the tree facing the direction they wanted it to fall, a laborious task done using axes. Next, the loggers would begin cutting a kerf on the opposite side of the tree using a long crosscut felling saw or even two saws brazed together. Sawyers would stand on spring boards driven into the tree to avoid the rotted lumber often present in the stumps of large trees. The advent of the chainsaw in the early 20th century led to much more efficient logging and crosscut saws were largely made obsolete by the 1950’s. In 1968 Congress created the Redwood National Park to protect the remaining 10% of the original redwood stands left after heavy logging. Interestingly enough, the first chainsaw was invented in 1830 by a German surgeon who used the small device to cut bone.

The Crosscut Sawyers IV was created using subdued tones of acrylic and watercolor paint. Overall, it has the feel of a vintage photograph steeped in history. The long-limbed characters were crafted using watercolor paper and pasted on the wood panel. See an illustrated guide of my process here.

The Jobs of Yesteryear are thought-provoking conversation pieces that will bring an air of history and whimsy to any room.

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