Chimney Sweep & Climbing Boy Original Mixed Media Painting

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TheChimneySweep 5MB.jpeg
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Chimney Sweep & Climbing Boy Original Mixed Media Painting

2,600.00

24x48 inches  |  ready to hang
acrylic, watercolor paper, kraft paper on stained birch panel

The Jobs of Yesteryear series combines history and surrealism to tell the stories of obsolete jobs. A contemporary glimpse into the past, these mixed media paintings serve as a reminder of time and stories long forgotten.

This particular Job of Yesteryear mixed media painting features a chimney sweep and climbing boy. Chimney sweeps have been clearing the ash and soot from chimneys since the first millennium and their task has changed little over the centuries. However, the tools they use to accomplish this task have undergone momentous change, especially when one considers that climbing boys as young as seven were employed to shimmy up the narrow flues and scrape the creosote and tar from the walls by hand. Chimney sweeping was one of the more difficult, hazardous, and low-paying jobs of that era and these climbing boys endured the brunt of those conditions, often getting trapped or asphyxiated in these abhorrent and cramped spaces. The modern chimney sweep's brush was invented in 1828 by Joseph Glass and eventually led to the outlawing of employing climbing boys. In my depiction of this occupation, a factory smokestack and church steeple loom in the distance, a nod to the roles that industry and the church played in this terrible practice (orphans under the church's care were often apprenticed as climbing boys). King William of Britain was once saved from a runaway carriage by a chimney sweep and since that day in 1066, they have been declared to be a sign of good luck, often donning a lucky 13 buttons on their coats.

The Jobs of Yesteryear are thought-provoking conversation pieces that will bring an air of history and whimsy to any room.

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