The Chimney Sweep & Climbing Boy
       
     
The Pirate
       
     
The Miller
       
     
The Deep Sea Diver II
       
     
The Haymakers
       
     
The Chimney Sweep & Climbing Boy
       
     
The Chimney Sweep & Climbing Boy

24x48 inches
acrylic, watercolor paper, kraft paper on stained birch panel

Chimney sweeps have been clearing the ash and soot from chimneys since the first millennium and their task has changed little over the centuries. However, the tools they use to accomplish this task have undergone momentous change, especially when one considers that climbing boys as young as seven were employed to shimmy up the narrow flues and scrape the creosote and tar from the walls by hand. Chimney sweeping was one of the more difficult, hazardous, and low-paying jobs of that era and these climbing boys endured the brunt of those conditions, often getting trapped or asphyxiated in these abhorrent and cramped spaces. The modern chimney sweep's brush was invented in 1828 by Joseph Glass and eventually led to the outlawing of employing climbing boys. In my depiction of this occupation, a factory smokestack and church steeple loom in the distance, a nod to the roles that industry and the church played in this terrible practice (orphans under the church's care were often apprenticed as climbing boys). King William of Britain was once saved from a runaway carriage by a chimney sweep and since that day in 1066, they have been declared to be a sign of good luck, often donning a lucky 13 buttons on their coats.

$2600 > SHOP

The Pirate
       
     
The Pirate

18x36 inches
acrylic, graphite, watercolor paper on stained birch panel

Pirates have been stealing cargo and terrorizing seafarers since the 14th century BC, when the Sea Peoples, a group of ocean raiders, attacked the ships of the Aegean and Mediterranean civilizations. From Ancient Greece to the Vikings to old Blackbeard himself, piracy has existed for as long as the oceans were plied for commerce. The practice has always been quite similar, with a large group of men (and on rare occasion, women) overwhelming the much smaller crews of merchant ships and plundering their goods. The main evolution over time has been the weaponry and the ships utilized by pirates, with modern sea robbers using automatic weapons and rocket propelled grenades aboard small motorboats to capture their loot.

$1400 > SHOP

The Miller
       
     
The Miller

18x36 inches
acrylic, watercolor, watercolor paper, kraft paper on stained birch panel

A miller is someone who operates a mill, a machine that essentially grinds grain into flour. Millers are among the oldest of professions and one of the most important in the development of agriculture, as milling a grain allows for easier digestion of its nutrients and is much easier on the teeth. Milling was first done by hand using a quern-stone (similar to mortar and pestle) until we learned to harness other sources of power such as water, animal, and wind, as depicted. This persisted for some time until a new form of power, electricity, was utilized, making the windmill obsolete. Recently, a newer and sleeker version of the windmill has emerged in the form of the wind turbine.

$1400 > SHOP

The Deep Sea Diver II
       
     
The Deep Sea Diver II

12x48 inches
watercolor, acrylic, watercolor paper on charred oak panel

Freediving for food or resources such as pearls and coral dates back to 4500 BCE. Since then, our ability to survive below the surface has radically evolved with many technological leaps along the way. One of the earliest types of equipment for underwater exploration was the diving bell, which evolved into surface supplied diving helmets attached to a waterproof suit in the early 19th century. They were supplied with compressed air by manually operated pumps and made underwater projects much more practical. Many developments followed, with a major leap coming in the form of the Aqua-Lung, invented by two Frenchmen in 1943 as the first open-circuit SCUBA system to reach worldwide and commercial success.

SOLD

The Haymakers
       
     
The Haymakers

36x36 inches
acrylic, watercolor paper, kraft paper on stained birch panel

For as long as herbivorous animals have been domesticated, their caretakers have cultivated grain and grass to keep them fed when they're unable to access pasture. This fodder is collectively known as hay and the folks who make it used to be called haymakers. Hay is very sensitive to weather conditions, especially when it's harvested, which used to quite a back-breaking process. Hay must be cut, dried, raked, baled, and stored. This was traditionally all done manually using a variety of wonderful tools such as a scythe, hay rake, and pitchfork. By the 1930s, most hay production was mechanized and these manual tools were replaced by wondrous machines.

SOLD